All posts by Robert Schlotter

malenki.net interview with Heidemarie von Wedel

Meanwhile in Stuttgart – Interview with Heidemarie von Wedel

What is your relationship to the medium photography?

I see photography as an instrument that suggests a mirror of the world, a fiction, a real dream that opens up further spaces. As a model-like record of a microscopically tiny section of the world and cosmos, photography shifts the scales of my perception. I work with image collections, either with found ones or with my own images. In a process of re-using, re-photographing, copying, or shifts of contexts, I create modulations from fragments of the everyday.

Heidemarie von Wedel

Seemingly self-evident realities open up to magic and mystery, to the unknown. I use images to show a fragile balance between realities. I am interested in border zones.
The world I see is a part of myself, I explore, I question, I become aware of. Seeing is a constant process of transformation within social and cultural spaces and practices. The question is not what I see, but what I perceive beyond the obvious.

What role does publishing play in your artistic practice and in particular in your work Echo ohne Ortsangabe and Cut #1?

The book is a paradox within systems between the art and book worlds and thus exciting and thus generating questions, provoking discourse. How do I read, how do I contemplate images? A book for me is both site-specific as independent work for the book/space and also image/work for an exhibition situation. In a work, I simultaneously discuss both, content and the book as a medium.

Heidemarie von Wedel — Echo ohne Ortsangabe
Echo ohne Ortsangabe — Heidemarie von Wedel
Heidemarie von Wedel — Echo ohne Ortsangabe
Echo ohne Ortsangabe — Heidemarie von Wedel

 

Echo ohne Ortsangabe (2017) is about forms of emptiness, of uncertainty. How do we remember? Images sometimes appear split on a double-page. They form new connections by scrolling. I ask, the images do not answer, they are my echo.
The main topic in CUT #1 (2016) is the cutting and the associated blank spaces. The “missing link” of the montages is formed by traces of images created by the translucent paper. Like shadows, they become part of a new constellation.
I like to compare a book with an image that is composed of fragments and textures with intervals. I see it as a space to combine heterogeneous aspects in the sense of intertextuality. A book formulates itself from its visuality and tactile qualities.

CUT #1 — Heidemarie von Wedel
Heidemarie von Wedel — CUT #1
CUT #1 — Heidemarie von Wedel
Heidemarie von Wedel — CUT #1

What are you working on at the moment?

COVID_19 changes our life on the planet. It changes forms of communication on many levels, also in my artistic work. Questions about uncertainties, fragility, transparency, misrepresentation, and fake, as well as questions about platforms of artistic discourse, presenting books and works are in a process of transformation. There are two major themes that have fascinated me for a long time, which I am currently taking up and looking at again: this is ‘the archive’ and ‘the studio’, both places of inspiration and encounter, interfaces between public and private.

To get a closer view inside Heidemarie von Wedel’s work visit her website under www.oliverleu.com

 

malenki.net features the following publications by Oliver Leu

 

malenki.net interview with Bénédicte Blondeau

Meanwhile in Berlin – Interview with Bénédicte Blondeau

What interests you in the medium of photography?

I like to work with a medium which by essence registers fragments of the ‘real’ world in order to create a new alternate reality. I see my images as ‘real and absolutely unreal at the same time‘, it is a sort of paradox I like to play with.

Bénédicte Blondeau self portrait
© Bénédicte Blondeau

What role does publishing play in your photographic practice and in particular in your work Ce qu’il reste?

I love the idea that my work can circulate anywhere in the world, without any restriction in time or space. Publishing my work as a book makes it more accessible and the relationship of the viewer to it is completely different from what it would be in a show. I love taking photo books in my hands, feel their texture; it is an experience that has something very intimate. The distance often imposed in a show (do not cross, do not touch the artworks…) disappears completely.

Ce qu'il reste — Benedicte Blondeau
© Bénédicte Blondeau — Ce qu’il reste
Ce qu'il reste — Benedicte Blondeau
© Bénédicte Blondeau — Ce qu’il reste

For me, a book also allows to tell a story that is more complete, because there is room for a different kind of images. Next to what I would call the ‘pillar’ images – the strongest from a series which deserve to be presented in a larger format – there is another sort of pictures that I might not show in an exhibition, while in a book they suddenly get an important role in telling the story. To me, those kind of images are very important in their coexistence with others and in this way, the book almost becomes like a protected environment for them.

What are you working on at the moment?

My latest project spontaneously emerged from the lockdown. I had the chance to spend the confinement on an island on the outskirts of Berlin. With the arrival of spring, I have observed the transformations of nature like never before. I started to collect my impressions in a new project called refuge.

Bénédicte Blondeau - From the series 'refuge'
© Bénédicte Blondeau – From the series ‘refuge’

 

To get a closer view inside Bénédicte Blondeau’s work visit her website under www.benedicteblondeau.com

 

malenki.net features the following publications by Bénédicte Blondeau

 

malenki.net interview with Dani Cardona

Meanwhile in Esporles — Interview with Dani Cardona

What interests you in the medium of photography?

In general, I am interested in photography and images for their ability to communicate. Images are a very present element in contemporary society, they are constantly consumed and created and (as happens with any human act or behavior) they generate communication. A communication based on the combination of images gives rise to visual narratives.

Dani Cardona

It is a communication in which there is no established vocabulary. A communication that can be divided into two parts: On the one hand the factual part — that is, what images provide us with on a documentary level and, on the other hand, the symbolic, aesthetic or subjective part, that photographs are capable to generate. My relationship with photography has gone through several stages: journalism, portraits, interiors or teaching. Now, I am interested in investigating visual narratives and how they are applied in today’s society.

 

What role does publishing play in your photographic practice and in particular in your work PARAiSO?

I think that the visual narratives applied to photo books are a very interesting way to deepen and continue analyzing the possibilities offered by the photographic medium.

 

Paraiso — Dani Cardona
Dani Cardona — Paraiso
Paraiso — Dani Cardona
Dani Cardona — Paraiso

 

What are you working on at the moment?

I am working on several projects at the same time. I don’t know which one I’m going to finish first. I like doing it like this. My personal work advances as a motivation, not as an obligation. That’s what commercial work is for. I like to feel free with what I do, experiment and then analyze.

To get a closer view inside Dani Cardona’s work, visit his website under www.danicardona.com

malenki.net features the following publications by Dani Cardona

 

Siska Vandecasteele - quote-fb

Meanwhile in Antwerp — Interview with Siska Vandecasteele

What interests you in the medium of photography?

In the past, I have often used photography as a medium to tell stories. A few years ago I started searching for other media to make work and my relationship with photography changed a little. I still like photos, but the layers in an image are more important than they used to be. Continue reading Meanwhile in Antwerp — Interview with Siska Vandecasteele